Radio Tahrir

Blog Archive

Recent Blog Posts

Newer12345...27Older

Thank You Michael Brown

August 20, 2014

by Barbara Nimri Aziz

Michael Brown is dead. Eighteen years old, a young man gunned down—not just shot--by police in his neighborhood in Ferguson, Missouri.

Brown’s experience earns international attention not because he is dead, but because of sustained outrage, first by his grieving family, then over video available from bystanders, then by people in his community demanding answers, then by shocked citizens around the country.

Extrajudicial killing of Black Americans, especially young men, is so, so common today. Many pass unnoticed. So, why the attention to this murder?

First, police refused to permit anyone near Brown’s body lying in the street. That ban included the boy’s own mother. Turned back by the police, she gazed at the lifeless body of her child in the road. Like a Gaza mother.

Second, residents alerted the media that Brown was lying in the road, guarded by police for more than four hours. No medics arrived to attend to him.

Third, a companion of Brown during the confrontation with the killer policeman testified Brown was unarmed, with his hands up in surrender when he was murdered. 

Fourth, the community’s call for explanations of the killing went unanswered. For almost a week, the police chief refused to release the name of the officer who’d killed Brown (with 6 gunshots!). Finally when public outrage grew and civic protests increased, reinforced police arrived to repel them armed with assault rifles and armored vehicles. They placed snipers around the neighborhood, deploying rubber bullets and tear gas against peaceful demonstrators. Journalists were among those mistreated by police and arrested. Was this Gaza or Baghdad? No, it’s hometown, USA.

As protests continue you hear leaders shout, “Thank you Michael Brown”. Brown is a martyr. As civil rights leader Jesse Jackson remarked on the killing of another young Black American, Trayvon Martin in 2012, "We find our way from the light that comes from the martyr." People associate Brown’s fate with too many other bodies lying in our streets (http://time.com/3136685/travyon-sybrina-fulton-ferguson/). A quiescent people become mobilized.

Why do we view Michael Brown as a martyr? Because his death serves to expose these routine American injustices:-- shooting Black unarmed citizens, unreasonable suspicion of Black and Brown people; disrespecting the dead and their families (perhaps the way US troops do in Afghanistan and Iraq). Our authorities exhibit fear and violence rather than empathy and patience. (Perhaps many of these policemen are veterans who shot their way through Iraqi and Afghan villages). Finally this incident confronts us with how shamelessly warlike our community policing is. We’re accustomed to watching such images in movies and in news coverage of foreign wars.

Now we understand how widespread military tactics are across the USA. Although they’re rarely telecast so widely. Normally hidden from public scrutiny, they’re confined to minority neighborhoods and to suspect immigrants. ‘Swat’ teams regularly charge into American homes, rifles ready, to assault mainly Black citizens. Muslim Americans too experience this. Abuse of young Black people by police is endemic; detention goes unchallenged. Multiple shots fired at an unarmed suspect is not new.

Why is Michael Brown a martyr? Because his death helped bring these everyday injustices to the fore. Because his death became a national spectacle. Because his death rightfully shames USA. Brown’s death says: “this is what American is”; it challenges the leadership to prove otherwise. His death is a not just a legal matter; it’s a moral issue we cannot turn away from.

Thank you Michael Brown. Thank you sons and daughters of Gaza, Iraq, Afghanistan, Egyot, Yemen, Syria.

 

[ Thank You Michael Brown ]

Challenging Academic Freedom in the USó the case of Steven Salaita

August 12, 2014

by Barbara Nimri Aziz

The morals and principles of all authorities need to be periodically examined. So it is that we find the University of Illinois is yet another institute of higher learning that falls short.

U. Illinois fails on the principle of academic freedom, having withdrawn its appointment to my colleague, Professor Steven Salaita. Salaita, a brilliant and daring young scholar in comparative literature was set to join U. Illinois’ department of American Indian Studies. Besides his work in comparative studies, Salaita is an expert in Arab American fiction and author of The "Uncultured Wars"  and "Israel’s Dead Soul" among many fine analytical treatises. U. Illinois’ decision to cancel Salaita’s appointment is said to be based on tweeted comments critical of Israel during the current Gaza crisis. But Salaita could well have already been targeted for his radical insights, his criticism of American liberalism, and analyses of Israeli policies. A campaign launched on behalf of Salaita is generating considerable attention.

Off the radar is the removal last week of another modest champion of free speech:-- “The Commentators”. The program aired over WHCR- 90.3fm “Voice of Harlem” at City College, a university celebrated for its progressivism. This too is a free-speech issue, since according to “The Commentators”’ host, Leroy Baylor, the administration attacked the show for inviting controversial guests such as American Muslim leader Louis Farrakhan. Baylor claims the university has consistently accused the program of “anti-Semitism”.

American universities have a shameful tradition of purging courageous scholars from their ranks for saying unpopular things. I’m reminded of South African professor and former Robben Island prisoner, Fred Dube. Dube was expelled from his post at Stony Brook University of New York in the mid-80s. The campaign against Dube was launched after he raised some poignant questions about Zionism in his classes. 

Then we had the notorious case of Sami Al-Arian, a Palestinian American professor who not only was removed from U. Florida in 2002 stemming from statements he made in a TV interview; he was indicted, jailed, subject to years of legal harassment. (Only recently he was cleared of all charges.)  Native American, Ward Churchill, distinguished professor of Ethnic Studies at U. Colorado was also fired because of statements made after the 911 attacks; Churchill was well known for his support of Palestinian rights (which de facto involves criticism of US-Israeli policies.) Then we have the case of Israel critic and author Norman Finkelstein. DePaul University fired him in 2012.

University administrators often conduct such purges over opposition from faculty committees.

These examples, where scholars fought back only to lose in the end, are the best known. In countless cases elsewhere, professors—it they are not fired—find themselves marginalized, denied promotion or otherwise ostracized for their stand in defense of Islam and in support of Muslim and Palestine rights. Others who speak out on certain taboo subjects early in their careers find themselves shut out completely.

In many institutions, most especially our exalted universities, there is an unspoken rule about criticizing Israel. Even a faculty member who hosts a ‘controversial’ guest lecturer can come under fire.

Some years ago I arrived at a New York university hosting a theatrical performance by an Arab American author. The scholar who invited me to lead the discussion afterwards was a doctoral candidate at that well-known graduate center. Welcoming me, she whispered “Every head of department here is Jewish”. I was shocked and asked: “What has this to do with the performance, or with me?” She could only reply, “Just keep it in mind.” In retrospect, I wonder if her warning was less about anything I might utter, and more a reflection of the chilling atmosphere in which she and fellow scholars function.

Today, activists and other concerned citizens feel the tide is turning-- that Israel can no longer control information and thwart free speech on our campuses. The campaign for U. Illinois to reverse its decision on Salaita rapidly garnered 13,000 signatures. Americans credit social media with spreading democracy across the globe. Can it be successfully mobilized in defense of freedom here? 

[ Challenging Academic Freedom in the USó the case of Steven Salaita ]

Even though a massacre is going on

August 05, 2014

by Barbara Nimri Aziz

Even though a massacre is going on, still the people of Gaza resist

Even though a massacre is going on in Gaza, genocide of Turkmen in Iraq is underway.

Even though a massacre is going on, US lawmakers award Israel millions more for weaponry

Even though a massacre in Gaza is underway, US president Obama remains mute and firmly loyal to his Israeli lord 

Even though a massacre is going on in Gaza, in the Occupied West Bank Palestinian demonstrators are killed, rounded up and imprisoned

Even though a massacre is going on, Israel insists it’s Palestinians who are to blame

Even though a massacre is going on, no Arab government has suspended its diplomatic ties with the Zionist state

Even though a massacre is going on, some South American countries cut their diplomatic relations with Israel

Even though a massacre is going on, US media devote excessive time to cover the fate of Israeli soldiers

Even though a massacre is going on, a feeble UN head, Ban Ki-moon, invokes international humanitarian law

Even though a massacre is going on, there are charges that those protesting Israeli actions are anti-Semitic

Even though a massacre is going on, Paris bans demonstrations and police arrest protesters who criticize Israel

Even though a massacre is going on, many remember Israel’s 2008-9 massacres of Gazans being a “game changer” Even though a massacre is going on, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Bolivia & Venezuela have reportedly decided to stop buying arms from Israel

Even though a massacre is going on, Gaza’s hospitals have nothing to treat the thousands of wounded civilians

Even though a massacre is going on, seven dedicated journalists have been killed exposing the truth

Even though a massacre is going on, major American networks and the BBC continue their pandering to Israel

Even though a massacre is going on, most US television network hosts refuse to suggest Israel may be wrong

Even though a massacre is going on, the United Nations itself is totally powerless to intervene or impose sanctions

Even though a massacre is going on, John Kerry, US secretary of state, turns over leadership of the crisis to Netanyahu

Even though a massacre is going on, Israel supporters assault demonstrators who dare oppose Israeli military actions

Even though a massacre is going on, most of the 3,000 comments on Yahoo News assail Islam, Muslims and Palestinians

Even though a massacre is going on, a pro-Palestinian demonstration of thousands in the US capital was reported on page 6 of The Washington Post metro section

Even though a massacre is going on, I chuckle at the blatantly absurd statements by supporters of Israel

Even though a massacre is going on, a rare White House comments that it is appalled by the shelling of a UN school

Even though a massacre is going on, the White House comment says nothing about the killing of refugees in the school

Even though a massacre is going on, we are informed how disruptive the war is for Israelis browsing in their shopping malls

 

[ Even though a massacre is going on ]

Toys: Girls and Boys

July 31, 2014

by Barbara Nimri Aziz

From Tom Sawyer, through Batman to A Wimpy Boy and the innocent Nemo.  It’s not just in math, science and journalism where our girls and women are marginal. Boy-man heroes dominate our children’s books; films too.

Among theories on socialization, I subscribe to the argument that serious life-models for our children derive from the admirable, heroic characters in our books and films. And boy heroes who far outnumber female champions of any kind-- even today-- affect girls’ aspirations and achievements.   

Hadn’t 40 years of feminist campaigns reversed the dominance of males in the bedtime stories we read to our children and the films we so enjoy together? Aren’t women in all police squads now? Harry Potter’s creator is a woman.

Certainly that movement awarded many more women iconic status. After Wonder Woman, we have Leia of “Star Wars”, Agent Scully of “X-Files”,  Katniss Everdeen of “The Hunger Games”, Barbara Park’s Jennie B Jones series for kindergarten kids, Elastigirl,  Xena Warrior Princess, and a host of ‘badass women’ sleuths.

Women are there. Somewhere. But boys and other male characters still dominate.

Arguments for stronger girl models to counter stereotypes of the bossy, the compliant or the adjunct female character are back. The debate’s been sharpened by Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s controversial Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. “We have too few women leaders”, notes Sandberg. She argues that girls and women are still constrained by low self-esteem; “Lean In” is her strategy to change that.  

Authors Hadley Freeman and Zoe Margolis are among the many journalists re-examining how heroic stories depict girls. Now animated films are brought into the argument. About time too. Animation is a major source of family fun-- and possibly, just possibly-- impact our children’s ideas of who can be brave and noble, dynamic and successful.

We have film interpretations of classics like Lord of the Flies and Harry Potter; we have video adaptations of bestsellers like Diary of A Wimpy Kid; and of course Disney’s fantasy hits. I marvel at the animation technology and human imagination that gave us “Toy Story”, “Finding Nemo”, and “Shrek”. (Even if all three of these happen to feature males in leading roles.) They offer entertainment for adults and children from Texas to Thailand. They are funny, playful, dazzling and touching.

But where are the girls? Am I just a grumpy lady frustrated by the sluggishness of feminist successes?

If so, I’m not alone. In the July issue of The Atlantic, Sarah Boxer convincingly demonstrates that female characters are not only secondary; those who save and protect lost children are predominantly male. She reviews the fate of cartoon mothers in some of our favorite animated tales, from “KungFu Panda”, “Little Mermaid”, “Ice Age”, “Aladdin”, “Pocahontas”, going back to “Bambi” and “Snow White”. In film after film, she shows the pattern:--mothers die, leaving orphans to be rescued by men, be they fish, lions or princes.

And we haven’t even mentioned the issue of American children’s falling reading levels. Where do we begin to counter the imbalance? Would Pixel editions of Jane Austen, Louisa May Alcott, Zora Neale Hurston, and Doris Lessing work?

Tell me I’m misinformed or unreasonable. Shower me with examples of the little girl heroes who inspire your daughters and granddaughters. Maybe your sons too.

[ Toys: Girls and Boys ]

Making Connections in Israel's Stategy

July 21, 2014

by Barbara Nimri Aziz

I really can’t comprehend what the long term intent of Israel’s current military action is. But I’ve had a most discomforting thought, namely that Israel’s short term aim is based on earlier developments-- the success of the boycott and divestment campaign—and to put the U.S. Congress on the spot.

Perhaps months ago Israeli strategists, noting how world opinion in their favor was waning, asked: “Will American lawmakers remain loyal? Could there be a crack in the Washington fortification we so carefully nurture? Are ‘they’ as solidly behind us as we demand?”

Of course, from the start of the attacks now underway on Gaza, the US media and U.S. leaders rush to affirm their allegiance: “Israel is justified-right or wrong”; “We must support them.”

But Israel might have needed reassurance from Washington well before this crisis erupted. Possibly months ago, Israel began to worry about the mandate it’s enjoyed for decades, and wondered if it remained beyond economic and moral censure. Because on other fronts it was facing serious threats to its immunity.   

Had you noticed how things hadn’t been going Israel’s way? During the past year the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Movement has made significant gains in securing pledges by institutions and individuals to divest their funds from Israeli companies and to boycott events there. Notable among those joining BDS’ call is the respected British physicist Steven Hawking, Microsoft’s Gates Foundation, the American Studies Association, and Roger Waters of Pink Floyd. Rock stars’ cancellation of their concerts and academic sanction indicate this is serious stuff.

BDS’s successes are augmented by the Palestinian leadership applying directly to the United Nations for recognition, and most recently, a hard won union with Hamas. If things continued this way, some U.S. leaders might reconsider their stand and find the courage to join the global chorus for justice.

Could the successes of BDS have so worried Israel that it needed to test its status with Washington?

What was Israel to do in the face of all those peaceful initiatives? Surely not re-enter peace negotiations in good faith. Nor halt illegal colonialist settlements. Release hostage prisoners, recognize the Palestinian right of return? You’re joking.

Israel is doing what it knows best:--stepping up the violence and terror, pressing ahead with ethnic cleansing, rounding up thousands, deploying its inexhaustible lethal arsenal while pleading danger from terrorism, crying that Syrian and Iranian arms for Gaza militants assault its cities and homes.

What better way to achieve assurance than to precipitate an event that obliges the U.S. president to reaffirm what he has done so consistently and loyally. If the virtue behind the boycott and divestment strategy reached the hearts and minds of any of our elected officials, now it may have been subdued. 

 One thing I’ve learned over the years of closely observing Israeli policy is that no action is simply a response to an alleged provocation. Israel’s moves are part of long-term strategies and careful control of their U.S. partnership. END

[ Making Connections in Israel's Stategy ]
Newer12345...27Older


Find Us on Facebook
Find Us on Facebook

"The mother is a school; empowering her is nation building." 

Ahmed Shawki. Egypt.

Tahrir Diwan

a poem.. a song..
poem Popular Palestinian Vocal
traditional song of The Homelands, Arabic

See poems and songs list

Flash
poems
poem Qur'an Surat Al-Qadr
from 'Approaching The Qur'an' CD, male reciter

See audio list

Book review
Elsa Marston Harik's
The Compassionate Warrior: Abd al-Kader of Algeria
reviewed by .

See review list

Tahrir Team

Aisha AlAdawiya and Hassen Abdellah
Read about Aisha AlAdawiya and Hassen Abdellah in the team page.

See Tahrir Team

WBAI Online

Select Links